Win a Rona Green miniature print competition

 

It is my pleasure to present the chance to win one of two miniature hand coloured linocut prints by yours truly.

 

'Stripes' and 'Spotty', hand coloured linocut prints, 9 cm x 13 cm, by Rona Green

‘Stripes’ and ‘Spotty’, hand coloured linocut prints, 9 cm x 13 cm, by Rona Green

 

To enter the competition:

 

1. You must be a follower of this blog

(An existing or new follower – go to the ‘Follow This Blog’ info at the top right hand corner of this page to sign up)

&

Be one of my mailing list subscribers

(An existing or new subscriber  – click here to visit my website and sign up)

 

2. Leave a comment telling me in 33 words or less why you like my art and want to win a miniature print

(Click on ‘Leave a comment’ at the top of this blog post)

 

Entries close at 6.00pm AEST on Monday 1 June 2015.

The two competition winners will be announced in a blog post the next day.

 

Good luck!

 

 


Girl on film

 

A while back I was visited at my Abbotsford Convent studio by Kate Logan from The Learning Connexion.

The purpose of Kate’s visit was to produce a documentary about my art practice as a resource for The Learning Connexion students.

Here is a link to the finished film for your interest –

 

 

And for your enjoyment here are some Girls On Film…

 

 

* If you would like to receive invitations for future exhibitions you can subscribe to my mailing list by clicking here (and all subscribers who sign up and provide a postal address get a goody bag via snail mail).

 

 


Supergraph in Melbourne

 

Entrance to Supergraph at the Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton

Entrance to Supergraph at the Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton

 

Supergraph

Contemporary Graphic Art Fair

Royal Exhibition Building

8 Nicholson Street, Carlton, Victoria, Australia

10am-10pm Saturday 15 & 10am-5pm Sunday 16 February 2014

Visit the Supergraph website for further information.

 

Rona's prints on exhibition as part of Supergraph Picks

Rona’s hand coloured linocuts, Vilem the Villain and Lazer, on exhibition as part of Supergraph Picks

 

Interior of the Royal Exhibition Building

Interior of the Royal Exhibition Building

 

Prints by Pearl Law on display in the Supergraph Salon

Prints by Pearl Law on display in the Supergraph Salon

 

Illustrations by Melanie Webb in the Supergraph Salon

Illustrations by Melanie Webb on show in the Supergraph Salon

 

Work by David Frazer on view plus his portable printing press

Work by David Frazer on view plus his portable printing press

 

Checking out the scene at Supergraph

Checking out the scene at Supergraph

 

Souvenir Supergraph booklet

Souvenir Supergraph booklet

 

Check out all the Supergraph activity via Facebook and Instagram.

 

 


Two for one

 

RGreen_NCFL_invite

 

AKeywan_SPE_invite

 

Free entry, all welcome!

 


A discussion with Deborah Williams

Deborah Williams is an artist who is based in Melbourne, Australia.

Working with intaglio printmaking, she lovingly explores the world of the canine.

Please enjoy my dialogue with Deborah about her art and interests.

Deborah Williams, Looking in from the outside, 2012, etching, engraving and roulette intaglio, 58 x 77.5 cm, edition 20

Rona: Please describe your art for us.

Deborah: When I look at dogs in and around me, I question whether dogs are seen for what they are, as separate beings. I observe that while we do not objectify our dogs per se, our feelings are frequently filtered through human perspectives; these dogs are therefore anthropomorphized, brought unwittingly into our worlds.

I strive to challenge the anthropomorphizing of dogs even though I acknowledge that my work, in common with historical and contemporary contexts of the representation of dogs, is none the less filtered through my own perspectives and brought into our world.

I aim to depict the dog not as a breed above, apart or beyond, but of its own, captured in a moment.

Deborah Williams, Alternative view, 2012, etching, engraving and roulette intaglio, 36 x 89 cm, edition 20

R: Why is the dog as subject matter so special to you?

D: I did not consciously set out to make images of dogs. It just seemed to evolve organically. In 1992 I adopted a Blue Heeler x from the pound. Ruby accompanied me often to the studio and I drew her in those moments when I felt at a complete loss or creatively uninspired. This seemed to happen often.

I began to look at the dog as a potent marker for the fragility of the world we live in. And they represent the qualities we advocate but cannot sustain – unquestioning love, inner peace, inexhaustible spirit. They educate, intrigue and amuse me.

Deborah Williams, A point of view II, 2012, etching, roulette and engraving intaglio, 69 x 43 cm, edition 20

R: Who has been an inspiration to you art wise?

D: Noel Counihan. I was fortunate to grow up with his linocut print The Hunger, 1959. Counihan believed printmaking was a Socialist art form, easier to disseminate to the masses. This philosophy had a direct impact on my decision to study Printmaking and has continually inspired me. His images keep me grounded. They challenge me to keep reflecting and I believe, always will.

R: Which of your art making tools is the favourite?

D: Roulette wheels.

Deborah Williams, Projection, 2011, engraving and roulette, 21 x 19 cm, edition 20

R: When you are working what do you listen to?

D: RRR or music ranging from Joan as Policewoman, Gil Scott-Heron and Beethoven.

R: What is your all time favourite book, and are you currently reading anything interesting?

D: All time favourite book would have to be The Catcher in the Rye by J D Salinger and I’m currently reading Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend by Susan Orlean.

R: Where do you like to visit for relaxation when not making art?

D: Somewhere warm with an amazing beach and great food. If that’s not possible, walking the parks around the Merri Creek or Yarra with my dog Kish.

R: Thanks for chatting with me Deb!

If you would like to see Deborah’s work in the flesh run along to her exhibition Sense of Self at Australian Galleries, 50 Smith Street, Collingwood, VIC, 3066. The show is on now and continues until Sunday 16 September 2012.

You can also check out more of Deb’s delightful work by clicking here to visit her website.


In conversation with Paul Compton

 

Black Horse of Sutton by Paul Compton

 

Paul Compton is a visual artist who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

Through his art Paul creates a magically haunting world for us in which to dwell.

This week I had a chat with Paul and this is what we nattered about…

 

The Phantom Limb by Paul Compton

 

Rona: Please describe your art for us.

Paul: I make drawings, prints, books and zines. I’m intrigued by the curious and dark aspects of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I am continually interested in the occult, literature, folk lore and outsiders. I tend to suggest narratives in my work that blend sad and grim elements of life with humour.

 

R: Which of your art making tools is the favourite?

P: My old-fashioned dip pen.

 

The Parlour by Paul Compton

 

R: When you are making art what do you like to listen to?

P: I love listening to music / musicians that are either obscure or largely forgotten. It feels special to know that I might be the only person in the world playing their song at that exact moment. I adore folk, 80’s & 90’s New Wave and Goth Bands, theatre musicals, bluegrass, classical (Scriabin is my favourite), 1970’s Glam Rock and any obscure German Chamber music I can get my hands on.

 

R: Who has influenced or inspired you art wise?

P: Odilon Redon, Gustave Dore, Edward Gorey, Peter Blake, James Ensor, Paula Rego, Vilhelm Hammershøi and more recently Grayson Perry. The most inspiring artists are the ones I see exhibiting regularly in Melbourne. I see their work progressing and they inspire me to keep going and attempt to get better at what I do each time. They have truly unique and personal styles which I find very encouraging. These artists include Deborah Klein, Shane Jones, Petr Herel, Steve Cox, Rona Green, Sheridan Jones and Jazmina Cininas to name just a few.

 

To Possess You With by Paul Compton

 

R: Where do you like to go to see some art?

P: I love the NGV International, Hand Held Gallery, Australian Galleries, Sophie Gannon Gallery, c3 contemporary art space, Craft Victoria and Bundoora Homestead.

 

R: What are your favourite horror film and ghost story?

P: My favourite horror films aren’t gory ones, more subtle and quietly disturbing. The Omen and Rosemary’s Baby are my favourite bedtime flicks. My favourite ghost story involves the Black Shuck which is a fierce, ghostly black dog that famously appeared to a church congregation in Blythburg, England in 1577. It killed two people, caused the church steeple to collapse through the roof and as it fled into the mist it left scorch marks on the northern door which can be seen at the church to this day!

 

Bat / Saint by Paul Compton

 

R: Why did you become an artist, and what do you enjoy most about the artistic life?

P: It is the only thing that gives me a true sense of an identity. When you put on an item of clothing it is designed by someone else and someone else in the world might be wearing it too but with making art it is purely the amalgamation of all the things that interest, inspire and scare me most. I enjoy the feeling of accomplishment when I finish an exhibition because then I can move on to my next one!

 

 

If you would like to view Paul’s art in the flesh go see his exhibition Domestic Disturbance at Hand Held Gallery, Suite 18 Paramount Arcade, 108 Bourke Street, Melbourne, running from 28 June til 21 July 2012.

You can check out more of Paul’s wonderful work by clicking on these links to his redbubble profile and blog.